Aging in Fur Babies

As your pet ages, you can expect to provide more care and help to enhance his or her quality of life.

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CHARLOTTE – Whether your fur baby has been with you since she was a young pup or adopted at a later point in life, she undoubtedly has become a member of your family. It can be a bit confusing knowing exactly when a pet is considered a senior- or even geriatric- especially when that range can vary for different animals, particularly in different breeds and sizes of dogs.

According to the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA), the term “senior” can describe an aging pet, but the number of years a pet is considered to be “senior” varies. Characteristics like breed, weight, and state of their organs can help in determining if a pet has reached “old age,” but in general, most dogs can be considered “senior” at some point between 5 and 10 years old.



Signs of aging in fur babies can be similar to those in humans. A senior dog might be slowing down and showing some early signs of old age diseases. For example, he might have developing arthritis, but mostly be able to do the same things as he always has. At the older end of the aging spectrum, pets can be considered “geriatric,” which typically means that they are experiencing more health-related issues and limited mobility.

As your pet ages, you can expect to provide more care and help to enhance his or her quality of life. Our goal at Passionate Paws is to work with and guide you through every stage of your fur baby’s life. Stay tuned for more information on this topic in the coming weeks!

Passionate Paws Animal Hospital is a proud member of the Union County Chamber of Commerce and the Waxhaw Business Association.

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